Get in shape with the Library: Sign up for ORCiD!

The beginning of a new year is a great time to make a fresh start. Your writing and publishing muscles might be ready for a good workout. If that’s the case, consider the Library as your publishing gym and the librarians as your personal trainers for research and writing.

Workout tips for Week 2:

Distinguish yourself from other researchers: get an ORCiD and link it to your NCBI account.

Your ORCiD ID is used within NIH and grants.gov to relate publications to grants. Link your ORCiD ID from your eRA Commons Personal Profile.

Make an appointment with your personal trainer to link your publications.

Get in shape with the Library: Organize!

The beginning of a new year is a great time to make a fresh start. Your writing and publishing muscles might be ready for a good workout. If that’s the case, consider the Library as your publishing gym and the librarians as your personal trainers for research and writing.

Workout tips for Week 1:
Make a clean sweep! Organize those folders of article PDFs with a citation manager.

Collaborate with colleagues. We have guides for EndNote, RefWorks, Mendeley, and Zotero. Each guide has its own Collaboration tab.

Cite it right! Meet your publisher’s style requirements – see our Authors Toolkit.

Make an appointment with your personal trainer to learn how to annotate your pdfs using EndNote or Mendeley.

Get in shape with the Library!

The beginning of a new year is a great time to make a fresh start. For many of us, this means hitting the gym and working with a personal trainer. Your writing and publishing muscles might be ready for a good workout as well. If that’s the case, consider the Library as your publishing gym and the librarians as your personal trainers for research and writing. Each week this month we’ll be posting another “workout tip”. Make strengthening your writing skills part of your New Year’s resolutions for 2020!

Access Millions of Images From PubMed Central Articles

Open-i enables search and retrieval of abstracts and images (including charts, graphs, clinical images, etc.) from the open-source literature, and biomedical image collections. Searching may be done using text queries as well as query images. Open-i provides access to over 3.7 million images from about 1.2 million PubMed Central articles; 7,470 chest x-rays with 3,955 radiology reports; 67,517 images from NLM History of Medicine collection; and 2,064 orthopedic illustrations.

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